COMING SOON... APRIL 2020


2020

Since World War I - more than 91,000 U.S. Service Members

 were classified as Missing and Unaccounted For -

POW/MIA.


Today - more than 81,000 U.S. Service Members 

remain classified as Missing and Unaccounted For - 

POW/MIA. 

PERSPECTIVE

Capacity: 90,000


Memorial Stadium

University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Lincoln, Nebraska

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POW/MIA FLAG

National League of Families POW/MIA Flag

The POW/MIA flag features a silhouette of a POW before a guard tower and barbed wire in white on a black field. “POW/MIA” appears above the silhouette and the words “You Are Not Forgotten” appear below in white on the black field. 


This black and white flag stands as a stark reminder of Americans still prisoner, missing or otherwise unaccounted for in Southeast Asia and is now accepted nationally and internationally as the symbol of vigilance and remembrance for all POW and MIA’s. 

POW/MIA flag

The original design for the flag was created by Newt Heisley in 1972. The National League of Families then-national coordinator, Evelyn Grubb, wife of a POW, oversaw its development and also campaigned to gain its widespread acceptance and use by the United States government and also local governments and civilian organizations across the United States. 

National POW/MIA Flag Act

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Public Law No: 116-67 (11/07/2019)

The bill changes the days on which the POW/MIA flag is required to be displayed at specified locations to all days on which the U.S. flag is displayed. (Current law requires the POW/MIA flag to be displayed only on Armed Forces Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, Independence Day, National POW/MIA Recognition Day, and Veterans Day.) 

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Rolling Thunder National

Pictured R-L:

Artie Muller, Joe Bean, Ed Crabtree, Joe Muller

POW/MIA RESOURCES

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Defence POW/MIA Accounting Agency 

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The National League of POW/MIA Families 

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The National Alliance of Families POW/MIA

EX-PRISONER RESOURCE

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 American Ex-Prisoners of War